Project delivery company - Wiley to build Australia’s first textile recycling facility

Mike Wheeler - Inside Waste

Aug 13, 2021

BlockTexx, Australia’s first textile recycling facility, which will divert around 4,000 tonnes of textiles from landfill in its first year, is underway.

BlockTexx, Australia’s first textile recycling facility, which will divert around 4,000 tonnes of textiles from landfill in its first year, is underway.

In the first year of operation, BlockTexx anticipates the facility, in Logan, Southeast Queensland, will recycle around 4,000 tonnes of textiles, create up to 30 new full-time jobs and up to $43 million economic impact to the local area.

Over the next four years, BlockTexx anticipates the creation of more than 140 jobs and more than 50,000 tonnes of recycled textile and a total CO2 offset of 1,250,000 tonnes (based on annualised amounts).

BlockTexx is working closely with Queensland’s well-known engineering and construction company, Wiley, on the first facility.

BlockTexx co-founders Adrian Jones and Graham Ross said their start-up has been made possible thanks to a trifecta of elements: a fundamental shift in the country prioritising sustainable design and solutions; partnering and engaging with ethically minded organisations; and a clear strategy towards ‘breaking down the fibres of misconception’.

​​”BlockTexx is now scaling our textile resource recovery technology,” Ross said. “The S.O.F.T. (separation of fibre technology) is a commercial scale solution to eradicate textile waste and breaking down no-longer needed clothing and textiles.”

BlockTexx’s textile recovery facility is world leading, combining chemical separation processes and advanced manufacturing.

Wiley will oversee the delivery of BlockTexx’s new facility, installation of the equipment and commissioning the plant.

BlockTexx recently undertook a Series A capital raise of $5.5 million, thanks to a mix of private investment, grant funds from three tiers of Government injection (including a $997,617 Federal commitment and $155,000 from Logan City Council), and support from seed investors.